Our Casualties of War


Good morning.

The trees are still as I look outside my windows.  It is also chilly again — in the 50s.  The weather is not something we can feel confident in at all these days.  I never know how Kate should dress for the day.  She is doing a great job at picking out her clothes lately and layering.  Layering.  I never knew about layering growing up in the South, but I have found it to be one of the most useful dressing know-how essentials.  I am thankful that Frank — having grown up in Jersey — can assist with the wisdom there for Kate and for me.

This weekend I was around a group of amazing women.  I was sitting at lunch with a couple — one of which I interviewed for the North Star Sessions almost a year ago — Teri Goetz.  Her website is http://healthybeing.com.  We had just listened to a phenomenal speaker who  I had never heard speak or heard of before.  His name is Bo Eason and he is a former pro football player turned speaker and playwright.  His play, Runt of the Litter, was just turned into a screenplay and is being directed by the director of Shawshank Redemption and the Green Mile.  I was blown away by the way he presented his story.  It made me think about why I do the work I do, a little deeper.

What came to me at lunch — on the way to lunch and in the lunch is that I am driven by the pain others are going through.  I am on a mission to lead a global movement to stop and change the way divorce happens in our world.

This why goes back to being a child when my grandaddy shot himself.  I did not understand and can clearly remember the adults around me trying to deal with the pain themselves and avoiding, ignoring me and my pain.  They thought that if they just dealt with it on their own and didn’t talk about it (actually pushed it under the closet doors to never talk about again), I would be fine.  Or, I am guessing this was there thinking.  In the mean time, I was a mess and really hurting.  I became my grandaddy’s defender in every way and wanted to make sure he and his memory were clearly visible at all times.  I erected a make-shift plywood sculpture” in his honor and tried to force the adults to a strict observance of holidays “like grandaddy wanted us to do it this way.”  Any time I heard that he was an alcoholic, I would remind everyone in the room that he LOVED his grandchildren more than anything and we loved him.  The adults seemed to forget the very important and magical relationship this man had with his grandchildren.  He may have been diagnosed paranoid schitzoprhenic, had been an abuser of my Granny (who I also love more than anything), was an alcoholic and killed himself.  But, he was one of the only adults growing up who truly GOT ME.  He was able to show love like no one else and he was able to see me as a human being even when I was a child.

Children should not be treated as if they are invisible.  They are right here in front of us, and they matter.  It is also important to remember that children form their own relationships with people.  Just because we have a difficult relationship with our spouse, does not mean that their relationship will also be difficult or even abusive.

We have our very own casualties of war in this country that have nothing to do with Afghanistan or Iraq.  They are our children, and they have virtually no say in how their parents divorce.  They have no control over the effect it has on them as children.  WE as adults are the only ones who can turn this war around.  We do have the control, and we have a responsibility  to stop acting out of fear, anger, resentment, shame and start acting like adults.  Only we can take the steps necessary to change the course of our divorce.  This may be one of our greatest challenges, but it is here for us to move through and to the other side.  No, it may not fair.  But it is.

The truth is only we can let someone else’s words or behavior hurt us.  We have the power within us to be okay just as things are and to end our own suffering and the suffering our children experience.  Conflict engagement or war takes two.  If one disengages, what happens?  In most cases, the other disengages because there is no one to engage.  It only takes one to stop the war.  I say this all of the time and it really comes down to who wants the war to end most.  If one of the two feels powerless or like the other owes him, one has to ask what is most important and also learn to trust that the universe is rearranging itself for your best interest.  How can you move onto your new greatness when you are dependent?  Don’t you choose to be free?

Trust that everything is going to be okay.  Trust that things are happening in this process for a reason.  When you know the effect this is having on you and your children, begin making choices from a place of inner strength, not fear and insecurity.  Know that you are loved, and love yourself.  Loving yourself (i.e., taking care of yourself) may mean absolutely, positively walking away.

“As long as you think that the cause of your problem is “out there”—as long as you think that anyone or anything is responsible for your suffering—the situation is hopeless. It means that you are forever in the role of victim, that you’re suffering in paradise.”
― 
Byron Katie, Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life

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Part of this struggle is getting ahold of your finances during and after divorce.  This week, I have interviewed a financial advisor to help think through some of the financial issues and planning that come up in divorce.  Information and educating yourself about the things you do not know helps to alleviate fear.  Listen to this week’s North Star Sessions interview with Chris Brasacchio.

 

 

Chris Brasacchio has been in the financial planning business for over 20 years.  He is a certified financial planner and has his own fee-based planning firm, Chart House Financial, in the Washington, DC metro area.  You can find more about Chris and his work at www.charthousefinancial.com.

 

Click here to listen to the interview.

 

 

 

With love and light,

 

 

 

P.S.      If you are struggling to find a way through this process, call me to discuss my family mediation services.  I also provide skype mediation sessions for those outside of the DC metro area.  (202) 587-2772.

P.S.S.  If you are looking for a coach to help you divorce different and do it less expensively (much less!) and with a reduction in conflict, contact me by replying to this email now or call me (202) 587-2772.

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